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thematically compare/contrast short story with a film 5-8 pages

select a short story that we have read together in class, about which you have not previously written, and compare/contrast it with a thematically related film for thematic critical analysis;

select a theme from a play, like The Glass Menagerie, and compare/contrast it with a thematically related film;

select a poem (s) from our anthology and compare/contrast it thematically to a film.

Past, successful examples:
a. Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? with 13 or Mean Girls or Lovely Bones
b. Cathedral and Scent of a Woman.
c. The Things They Carried and Full Metal Jacket.
d. A Good Man is Hard to Find and No Country for Old Men.
e. Sonnys Blues and Walk the Line, Pollock, Ray
f. Cathedral and Gran Torino
g. My Papa’s Waltz” and This Boy’s Life
h. Indian Education and Crash
i. The Glass Menagerie and Dead Poets Society
j. A Good Man is Hard to Find and Batman: The Dark Knight
k. The Things They Carried and The Hurt Locker
l. The Glass Menagerie and A Streetcar Named Desire, film version
m. The Road Not Taken and Butterfly Effect
n. The Glass Menagerie and Whats Eating Gilbert Grape
o. Sonnys Blues and A River Runs Through It

NOTE: You may feel free to use one of these examples. Just know that previous students have used them and have done exceptional work with them as a focus.

Where can you view films? The MVCC library has a wide array of films to choose from and you can watch them from home! For free!

https://lib.morainevalley.edu/libservices/DigitalResources.html

Goals:

Create a solid thesis to prove to your audience that meaningful, arguable connections tie the two works together thematically.

Locate, evaluate and correctly integrate appropriate secondary sources as a means of support & illustration.

Develop a well organized and substantive body with evidence, explanations, and logic.
__________________________________________________________________________
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Step Two: Generate and record your own opinions with regard to the work or subject matter. Get feedback from peers, professor, and/or The Speaking &Writing Center (available via remote consultation).

Step Three: Do Preliminary Research
A. Create a list of possible search terms to use for database inquiries;
B. Try multiple databases and full-text journals;
C. Meet online with an information specialist to discuss your project;
D. Based on your results, refine your search terms or rethink your term paper focus;
E. Select the best possible sources that meet the following criteria:
1. Reliable 2. Credible 3. Relevant 4. Timely 5. Appropriate

Step Four: Review and evaluate your research, highlighting, taking careful notes.

a. Do you agree with the writers and their analyses, or are you in disagreement with a particular critic and her theories?
b. Have you discovered a new idea? Record it and give credit to the source.
c. Have you learned additional facts that deepen your understanding of the subject? (McKeague 265). Record it and give credit to the source.
d. Will you need different resources? Think critically about your information needs.

Step Five: Formulate a working thesis that states your claims. Submit a Formal Topic Proposal.
(See upcoming due dates)

Step Six: Create an outline using the Literary Research Plan Sheet handout and consult with the professor via e-mail or online chat.

Step Seven: Write a draft of your paper.
Options:
a. share your writing with peers during a peer evaluation.*
b. make an online appointment with the Speaking & Writing Center to discuss thesis development, topic sentences, and organization.

Step Eight: Revise
a. make sure your thesis statement is clear, focused, assertive, and arguable. Avoid creating a so what construction!
b. follow the guidelines for creating analytical paragraphs (see handouts)
c. check sentences for clarity and appropriate word choice.
d. make sure borrowed ideas are attributed clearly to the original, correct source.
e. check the beginning of each paragraph for transitions or reader cues to help your reader follow your organizational pattern.
f. follow manuscript guidelines
d. make sure the Works Cited page follows MLA guidelines and is alphabetized by the authors last name.
I will thematically compare/contrast the short story where are you going where have you been with the film mean girls